Dry Rosé Sangria

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I love finding good sangria, because I believe it to be rare. (Unless you're in Spain— then it's all good!) I've been disappointed more times than not when ordering Sangria here in the States. Why? Because (to me) it's way too sweet. Yuck. I've tried to make it before and those recipes always disappointed me, too. Therefore I present to you my dry rosé sangria recipe that I am over the moon about.
Of course, anytime I adapt a recipe I must give credit to where I drew the most inspiration from for that particular recipe. In this case, it goes to Kathryne Taylor. Her recipe for her Strawberry & Rosé Sangria in her cookbook Love Real Food, was my main source from which I adapted this recipe.If you're familiar with Sangria and rosé, skip down to the recipe and cut to the chase.

If you're not, here are three quick recipe notes:

*Sangria, by nature, is sweet. After all, it's wine mixed with liqueur and fruit then left to sit for a day or two. This recipe is no exception, but there is no extra sweeteners added, and it's definitely not overly sweet. However, if you simply do not like even slightly sweet drinks, then sangria may not be for you at all. Just letting you know before you waste a perfectly good bottle of wine. The sweetness from the fruit and the St. Germain (elderflower liqueur from France) will give the sangria it's slightly sweet flavor. Because it's slightly sweet, sangria is the perfect happy hour beverage on a scorchin' hot day. Sangria, to me, is a hot weather drink only.

*You don't need high dollar rosé for sangria. Any dry rosé that you like— it will do just fine. In fact, I personally would not use a high dollar one, because this will marinate with all the other flavors in the recipe and high dollar rosé is best sipped and appreciated on its own. My favorite rosés are from France, where they originate from, but again, any dry rosé will do. (This recipe is turning very French, n'est-ce pas?)

*Do I need to explain the difference between white zin and rosé?! Please say no. Totally different wines. Don't confuse the two.

Make this for your next happy hour, invite your friends, and cheers to this easy recipe.

Dry Rose Sangria recipe:

Ingredients:
1 bottle dry rosé
1/4 cup St. Germain (or other elderflower liqueur)
1 large orange
1 crisp & tart apple (not a soft or overly sweet apple), cut into chunks
1 1/4 cups ripe strawberries, topped and cut in half
1/3 grapefruit(*I have not tried it yet (because they're not in season yet), but I plan to try this with peaches instead of strawberries as soon as peaches are here for the year!) 

Recipe:
• Cut the orange in half. Juice one half into a pitcher. Cut the other half into slices, and toss them into the pitcher as well.
• Cut one thick slice of grapefruit, about an inch thick. Then cut it in half. Place in the pitcher.
• Cut the apple into large chunks and cut the tops off the strawberries and slice them in half. Toss them in the pitcher, too.
• Add the 1/4 cup St. Germain and the rosé, and stir well.
• Refrigerate overnight.  (Don't skip this step. It needs time to develop.)
• Serve over ice.
• Drink! Cheers! Enjoy!
Love and Light.
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